Three Mistakes of First-Time Triathletes

Triathlon training can seem simple: do as much work as you can in the three disciplines and you should taste success. However, like all parts of life, that philosophy is not, and will never be, that easy. If you are preparing for such marathons you should definitely connect with gymshark athletes that have a lot of experience with these kinds of races. They will be able to help you with your training routine and will suggest you necessary changes in your diet as well. 

Instead, training for your first triathlon takes as much intellectual preparation as it does physical training. Prior to diving into the pool and cranking out endless laps or jumping on the bike to do a long ride on an early Saturday morning before the traffic gets heavy, sit down and map out your strategy, taking into account your weaknesses. Make sure you possess a desire to learn how to train, not just to go and train.

If you follow this advice, you’ll avoid these three big mistakes far too many triathlon newbies make.

  1. Not Enough of the Bike: Inevitably, when you talk to someone who has never done a triathlon, even someone who is wider than they are tall and never leaves the couch except for an elongated potty break, this person will say something like, “I could never swim that far, and I don’t run unless I’m being chased, but I could ride a bike forever.” Needless to say, these folks have it all wrong. If they hopped on a bike and were told to cover even a small 25-mile course, they’d be cramping and sore halfway through, begging for water on the doorsteps of the houses along the route. So, to avoid being like one of these folks, spend a ton of time on the bike. If you think you spend considerable time there already, it is probably still not enough. Cycling is the biggest part of prepping for a triathlon, so pump up those tires and hit the road. You can’t go wrong here.
  1. Forgetting about Race Hydration and Nutrition during the Race: Many people change their diets to fit the goal of competing in a triathlon, yet an oddly high number of people arrive ill-prepared for what it takes to keep the body fueled during the actual event. One small water bottle cage on your bike will not satisfy you on a 90-degree day over 56 miles. Having hydration systems in place-multiple bottles mounted on the saddle or using a water belt during the run-will give you the chance to stay balanced and focused. Likewise, having nutritional supplements, like gels and energy bars, to ingest during the competition will let you avoid that energy low that will, without a doubt, cause a serious downfall. Thus, practice race nutrition and hydration during your training so that on race day you can move flawlessly and without concern.

  1. Misunderstanding the Need to Taper: The body needs rest, and training it into the ground the week before the race will decimate you during the big event. Most people new to the sport want to use every moment to rack up miles, yet is that really needed? Sure, during the heavy weeks it is, but when you close in on race day, you need to scale back and let your body recover and prepare for the challenge that awaits. Proving to yourself that you can finally run 13.1 miles without stopping three days before the race might make you feel accomplished then, but it will almost ensure that you fail to do it when it really matters. Follow a designated training plan that has a quality taper section built-in at the end. Your body will love you for it.
Patrick

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Patrick is a part-time fitness trainer and pursuing his Master’s in American Literature from Stanford University. He wishes to share his fitness plan with others to help them achieve their goals in terms of fitness and education.